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UD ISE Lab Winter, January 24-25, 2018

Event Date: 
Jan 24 2018 - 9:00am to Jan 25 2018 - 5:45pm

The DISCovery Project:

Discover Delaware Interdisciplinary STEAM Citizen Science Project
Professional Development Workshop
Location: ISE Lab 110
University of Delaware: Interdisciplinary Science Learning Laboratories
Sponsored by the Delaware Department of Education
US Department of Education Mathematics-Science Partnership
(DDOE MSP) and the University of Delaware
Wednesday 24 January 2018
8AM Sign-in and Welcome by Jon Manon, Group Introductions, and Division
into initial five Working Groups
8:30AM Exciting Developments in Science: Professor Véronique Petit,
Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Delaware
Einstein’s Prediction of Gravitational Waves Confirmed and Visualized
Professor Petit will describe the significance of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics and
Astronomy. The Nobel Prize in Physics 2017 was divided, one half awarded to Rainer
Weiss, the other half jointly to Barry C. Barish and Kip S. Thorne "for decisive
contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves". She gave
an incredible well-illustrated talk this Fall at our campus’ Nobel Symposium which we
wanted to share with you. In addition to presenting on this pioneering work, she showed
images of the recently observed collision of supernova that is the type of event
responsible for the formation of huge amounts of heavy elements like gold and platinum.
Dr. Véronique Petit
Assistant Professor
Physics & Astronomy
-Dr. Véronique Petit studied Physics at Université
Laval in Québec City, Canada. Dr. Petit is
interested in the lives of massive stars, which are
tens of times more massive than our Sun,
especially in the relatively new and rapidly
evolving study of these stars’ intriguing magnetic
fields. She uses state of the art observations to
challenge, constrain, and guide quantitative
theoretical models, within the context of large
observing programs such as the Magnetism in
Massive Star (MiMeS) and the Binarity and
Magnetic Interactions in various classes of Stars
(BinaMIcS) projects. Her key areas of expertise
include optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray
spectroscopy, optical spectropolarimetry,
polarized radiative transfer, and Bayesian
inference.
DISCovery Workshop University of Delaware/DDOE MSP Page 2
Wednesday 24 January 2018 (continued)
9:30AM – 11:30AM Five Interdisciplinary Workshops
We ask each member of a school group to go to a different workshop so that later in the
afternoon your team can decide which workshop they would like to collectively attend on
Thursday.
Interdisciplinary Workshop 1: Astrophotography and Galaxy Zoo
https://twitter.com/galaxyzoo https://blog.galaxyzoo.org/2010/12/22/galaxy-zoo-multi-mergers/
Leaders: Nico Carver, Student Multimedia Design Center at the University of Delaware
Library, and member, Delaware Astronomical Society;
Jon Cox, Department of Art and Design and Interdisciplinary Science Learning
Laboratories, a National Geographic Explorer; and, Jon Manon, Mathematics Education.
Nico Carver is a senior assistant librarian in the Student Multimedia Design Center at the
University of Delaware Library. He coordinates services at the Center, and consults on
questions related to a variety of photographic tools. He is the Chair of Elections of the
Delaware Astronomical Society (<http://delastro.org/about/about-the-das>). He
specializes in astrophotography by taking wide-field photographs of the stars and large
nebulae with a DSLR camera.
DISCovery Workshop University of Delaware/DDOE MSP Page 3
Jon Cox is a National Geographic Explorer, an assistant professor in the Department of
Art at the University of Delaware, Board Member of the Dorobo Fund for Tanzania and
Board member of the Amazon Center for Environmental Education and Research. Cox’s
latest published work was a six-year collaborative documentary book project with huntergatherers
in Tanzania titled Hadzabe, By the Light of a Million Fires. Cox has directed
over twenty photographic study abroad programs across the globe including destinations
to Antarctica, South East Asia, Tanzania, Australia, Tasmania and several countries in
South America. He was a pioneer in the field of digital photography, served as the
adventure photographer/writer for Digital Camera Magazine and authored two Amphoto
digital photography books. Cox is a co-recipient of a National Geographic - Genographic
Legacy Fund Grant to support his current collaborative cultural mapping initiative with
the Ese’Eja hunter-gatherers living in the Amazonia basin of Peru. Watch a video of his
recent Amazon voyage: (<https://vimeo.com/224861072>).
Jon Manon is the co-PI of the DISCovery Project. His recent positions included:
Associate Director, Professional Development Center for Educators; Director,
Mathematics and Science Education Resource Center, Public Service Faculty, School of
Education; Senior Policy Scientist, Mathematics and Science Education Resource
Center; Director, Mathematics Component, Delaware Statewide Systemic Initiative;
and, a major contributor to the Delaware Mathematics Coalition. He is the recipient of
DISCovery Workshop University of Delaware/DDOE MSP Page 4
the university’s Webber award in mathematics education and currently serves as the
President of the Delaware Foundation for Science & Mathematics Education. Jon has
been a long-term advocate for social justice, equity, and diversity. With his recent
acquisition of a fine telescope, it has rekindled his major interest in astronomy.
Astrophotography The equipment, art,
techniques, and mathematics of doing
astrophotography as well as a “Citizen Science
Project” Galaxy Zoo will be introduced such
that you can engage students in successfully
exploring astronomy even in our light polluted
neighborhoods. Beautiful images of the Aurora
Borealis filmed in Iceland and of large diffuse
nebulae, which were captured in Newark, will
be shown.
Galaxy Zoo With its roots dating back to July
2007, Galaxy Zoo is a renowned online citizen
science project that began with a data set made up
of a million galaxies imaged by the Sloan Digital
Sky Survey and currently has the largest number
of publications based on citizen scientists’ input.
Originally, the first Galaxy Zoo was a
classification of galaxies into ellipticals, mergers,
and spirals, additionally recording the direction of
the arms if the galaxy was a spiral. Volunteers’
classifications have been useful for a significant
number of researchers. In the subsequent Galaxy
Zoo phases, more detailed images have been
provided to volunteer classifiers which yield more
specific data that supports an understanding of
potential growth factors such as mergers, active
black holes, and star formation. New, exciting
discoveries are being made through Galaxy Zoo
including most recently simulations of 936
galaxies for data analysis in 2016.
To find more information about Galaxy Zoo,
please visit
https://www.galaxyzoo.org/#/story and watch
the YouTube videos: fun TED talk by a Citizen
Scientist: “The discovery of a citizen scientist-
Hanny van Arkel –TEDxGhent:”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0aTfcXp
OEs&t=138s (7 minutes long) and for a more
technical talk by an astrophysicist: “Citizen
Science: Galaxy Zoo”:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vX5-
kI2XvWE (54 minutes long).
http://www.astropix.com/
DISCovery Workshop University of Delaware/DDOE MSP Page 5
Interdisciplinary Workshop 2: Dance: Physics and Ecology
With our STEAM theme, we wanted to move beyond our previous exploration of
art to include STEM and the performing arts. How do some dancers appear to
violate the “laws of physics”? (See three sites with such claims of the impossible:
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/the-magic-of-pilobolus/;
http://www.alisonchase.org/ and <https://holykaw.alltop.com/world-of-dancecompetitor-
defies-the-laws-of-physics-video>). Thus, we are delighted to invite
you to explore such physics concepts as: Centripetal Force, Kinetic and Potential
Energy, Newton's Second Law, Newton's Third Law, Projectile Motion, Velocity,
Center of Balance, and Biomechanics in the context of dancing. For example,
visit:https://sites.google.com/site/thephysicsofdancing/dancing-with-thephysics/
newton-s-second-law; http://slideplayer.com/slide/9796803/; and
Professor Ken Laws’, Dickinson College, books on Physics and Dance. The
famous dance group Pilobolus actually runs workshops on Physics and Dance
(check this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Y38bUumNak). Also, how
might you engage your students in understanding complex relationships in
ecology through dance?
DISCovery Workshop University of Delaware/DDOE MSP Page 6
Leaders: Jam`e McCray, Sea Grant, College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment;
Kimberly Schroeder, Dance Minor Director; a joint program between the College
of Arts and Sciences and the College of Health Sciences; and,
Chritina Wesolek, Interdisciplinary Science Learning Laboratories
Jam`e McCray Kim Schroeder Christina M. Wesolek
Sea Grant Project Professor Dance Preceptor, ISLL
Jame McCray, is Director of Sea Grant Project at the University of Delaware and a
professional dancer. She received her Ph.D candidate in Wildlife Ecology and
Conservation at the University of Florida and completed a residency in their SciArt
Center Bridge Residency program. During her collaboration she created a dance
piece based on the behavior of birds - learn about her project through the video
below, and read her residency blog at http://www.sciartcenter.org/group-1. She is
a resident Artist in the LandLab Dance Exchange, a non-profit dance organization
based in Takoma Park, Maryland, that is known for innovative performance projects
and creative practices that engage communities and partners across wide ranging
disciplines. Dance Exchange creates performance engagements that speak to the
issues of a place and the people that steward that place, collaborating to advance
how individuals and communities come together to create change in the world. She
and her colleagues recently performed at UD’s Coast Day in Lewes.
Professor Kimberly Schroeder is director of the Dance Minor at the University of
Delaware. The Dance Minor is a joint program between the College of Arts and
Sciences and the College of Health Sciences. Professor Schroeder holds a Bachelor of
Arts in Dance and Vocal Music Performance from the University of Nebraska-
Lincoln, and a Master of Fine Arts in Dance from the University of Wisconsin-
Milwaukee. She also serves as the production manager for the annual dance minor
concert, as well as master teacher, choreographer and performer in a variety of
venues. She teaches classes in ballet, modern, jazz, tap, musical theatre, pilates,
improvisation, composition, pedagogy and has had the privilege of studying with
numerous guest artists in several dance techniques including African, Fosse,
Graham, Humphrey-Weidman, Limon, and Horton. Kimberly has been the
DISCovery Workshop University of Delaware/DDOE MSP Page 7
choreographer of over 40 musical theatre, non-musical theatre productions and
concert works. She has worked in regional and national theatre, including national
tours with the Missoula Children’s Theatre and international performances in
Jamaica, Ireland, and Canada. She is a member of the National Certification Board for
Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork, Associated Bodywork and Massage
Professionals, American Fitness Professionals & Associates.
Christina M. Wesolek is a Preceptor in the Interdisciplinary Science Learning
Laboratories at the University of Delaware. Her primary roles are as an Educator, a
Mentor, and a Curriculum Developer for SCEN 101: Physical Science and Astronomy
(an interdisciplinary science, problem-based learning, STEM course primarily for preservice
teachers). She also has experience in ballet. This past summer she led a research
project on protecting marine turtles on a Greek Island in the Mediterranean. Her prior
international work was as a Project Coordinator at the Antioch University New England
and the National University of Rwanda and doing field work in Panama. She has been a
Research Associate at Walt Disney World’s Animal Kingdom and at the University of
Central Florida. At the College of Mount Saint Vincent, she was an Adjunct Professor
who taught Anatomy & Physiology, Animal Behavior, and Urban Environmental
Education as well as being a Director of Development. She is a member of the Regional
Network for Conservation Educators in the Albertine Rift www.rncear.org.
DISCovery Workshop University of Delaware/DDOE MSP Page 8
Interdisciplinary Workshop 3: Improv Science:
Leaders: Nico Galloway, Neuroscience Major and Leader, Rubber Chicken Improv
Actor Alan Alda was one of the first to use improv as a foundation to help researchers learn
science communication skills (<http://improvscience.org/alda>). Raquell Holmes, the founder
and director of Improv Science states: “STEM professionals, with the help of improvscience, are
recognizing that creating improvisational ensembles and collaborative communication is critical
to their own growth and science. This ability to create new ways of talking and working with each
other has paved the way to a new vision of what scientific culture can become.” “Improvisational
theater, also known as “improv,” is a form of live theater in which performers build on one
another’s spontaneous words and actions, creating the story line, characters, and dialogue on the
spot. There are no “no’s” in improv; in fact, the phrase “Yes, and …” is the guiding principal
governing the art form. … improv teaches a number of important lessons, including focused and
active listening, confident and effective interpersonal communications skills, teamwork,
leadership, and even crisis management,” according to Michael Hartwell, Johns Hopkins
University “Improv Science” course instructor and education director of the Baltimore Improv
Group. The Rubber Chicken Improv group is one of two improvisational theater groups at the
University of Delaware. The group was founded over fifteen years ago and specializes in both
long and short form improv (see their YouTube video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ECPh15zMTk). They will engage participants in a variety
of investigations of the power of humor in the context of the brain sciences and some recent
applications to helping patients with Parkinson’s disease (“Active Theater as a Complementary
Therapy for Parkinson’s Disease Rehabilitation” in The Scientific World Journal; “Laughter is the
best medicine: The Second City® improvisation as an intervention for Parkinson's disease” in
Parkinsonism and Related Disorders; “An Empirical Study of Cognition and Theatrical
Improvisation” from Georgia Tech; “Comedic Improv Therapy for the Treatment of Social
Anxiety Disorder” in Journal of Creativity in Mental Health; “Embodied Cognition Through
Improvisation Improves Memory for a Dramatic Monologue” in Discourse Processes; and,
“Working without a net: improvisational theater and enhanced well-being” in Frontiers in
Psychology.
DISCovery Workshop University of Delaware/DDOE MSP Page 9
Interdisciplinary Workshop 4: Art Conservation: Chemistry in Service of History
Leaders: Professor Jocelyn Alcantara-Garcia, Art Conservation; and,
Zach Voras, Interdisciplinary Science Learning Laboratories
Professor Jocelyn Alcantara-Garcia
Art Conservation
Professor Jocelyn Alcántara-García joined
the Winterthur Museum Scientific Research
and Analysis Laboratory Conservation
program in the fall of 2014 after working for
about five years in interdisciplinary projects
(predominantly in Mexico, where she was
born). All projects were conducted in close
collaboration with conservators and
scientists, and included the examination of
iron gall inks, archaeological organic
materials and seashells, research on
degradation of certain conservation and
restoration materials, investigation for the
development of novel methodologies for
paper stabilization as well as identification of
binding media in pre-Columbian wall
paintings and non-destructive examination of
archival material.
Dr. Zachary Voras is a Preceptor in the
Interdisciplinary Science Learning
Laboratories. He earned his Ph.D. in analytical
chemistry from the University of Delaware in
2017. He worked closely with colleagues in the
Art Conservation program particularly in the
use of advanced spectroscopic techniques. He
recently published: “Comparison of Oil and Egg
Tempera Paint Systems using Time-of- Flight
Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS)”
in Studies in Conservation.
DISCovery Workshop University of Delaware/DDOE MSP Page 10
For this workshop, participants will be investigating the various uses of historic dyes and
their associated chemical properties. This inquiry-based workshop will engage
participants in laboratory experimentation into the various steps of the dyeing process and
the use of modern chemical understanding to explain the findings of the laboratory
experiments. We will discuss historical and cultural relevance of natural dyes. The
workshop will begin by using some historical dyeing processes, an art-form that has been
practiced for thousands of years across nearly every culture. Background information will
be provided on the chemical and biological significance of each step in order to explain
the laboratory results they will observe in the laboratory experience. The laboratory
component will consist of experimentation on the major steps found in the dyeing
process, starting with extraction and preparation of a dye from the natural source (such as
tree bark or a flower petal), combining either the dye (or fabric) with a mordant to aid in
the uptake of dye into the fabric/material, (pre/post/non-mordanting), as well as the use of
various materials (cotton vs. nylon) and their ability to bond with the dye. A key feature
of this inquiry-based laboratory component will be the use of null experiments that allow
participants to firsthand observe a non-expected outcome, an important part of any
modern scientific process. Lastly, the participants will be asked to reflect upon a set of
questions that provide ample follow-up discussion material that link together the
historical background with the laboratory experiments. This discussion will include
qualitative observations from the laboratory, as well as chemical/biological concepts such
as bonding, inter-molecular forces, and kinetics.
Art conservation involves “the application of chemistry to the technical examination,
authentication, and preservation of cultural property. Chemists working in museums
engage in a broad range of investigations, most frequently studying the chemical
composition and structure of artifacts, their corrosion products, and the materials used in
their repair, restoration, and conservation. The effects of the museum environment,
including air pollutants, fluctuations in temperature and relative humidity, biological
activity, and ultraviolet and visible illumination, represent a second major area of
research. A third area of interest is the evaluation of the effectiveness, safety, and longterm
stability of materials and techniques for the conservation of works of art. Though
analytical techniques appear to dominate, many other areas of chemistry, biology,
physics, and engineering, including polymer chemistry, kinetic studies, imaging
methodologies, biodegradation studies, dating methods, computer modeling,
metallography, and corrosion engineering, play active roles in conservation science.”
(<https://www.accessscience.com/content/art-conservation-chemistry/052250>)
DISCovery Workshop University of Delaware/DDOE MSP Page 11
Interdisciplinary Workshop 5: 4D Fab Lab From Dürer and Dali to 4D Printing:
You Can’t Make It Til’ You Shake It
Leaders: Nicole Brovarski, Mechanical Engineering;
Mallory Griffin, David Appleby, and Marissa Fichera, Biomedical Engineering; and,
John R. Jungck, Interdisciplinary Science Learning Laboratories
The 4D Self Assembly Team (from left to right): Professor John R. Jungck, Director,
Interdisciplinary Science Learning Laboratories; David Appleby, Biomedical
Engineering; Nicole Brovarski, Mechanical Engineering; Marissa Fichera, Biomedical
Engineering; and, Mallory Griffin, Biomedical Engineering.
How do complicated structures self-assemble? How can random processes produce
beautiful, symmetric, and complex designs? How can we build structures that optimally
and completely fill 3D space? In this workshop, we will have you build a variety of
polyhedral using a variety of construction materials and see how mathematical
projections help solve 4D design problems. The fourth dimension in 4D printing is time.
DISCovery Workshop University of Delaware/DDOE MSP Page 12
Dürer Nets for Origami Schlegel diagrams for Buckyballs
Albrect Dürer, the artist, wrote a manual on the mathematics of perspective for artists in
1525 wherein he introduced what we call Dürer nets which are now widely used in
origami construction of polyhedra. In the 1880’s, the mathematician Schlegel introduced
what we call Schlegel diagrams. Afterwards, Alicia Boole focused on how to visualize
four-dimensional polytopes. In 1954 the nontraditional, surrealist Salvador Dalí used her
mathematical approach to produce his famous oil-on-canvas painting “The Crucifixion
(Corpus Hypercubus)”. We will use a variety of materials to construct three dimensional
polyhedra and produce multiple two dimensional geometric and topological projections
of the polyhedral that you have built and to infer some fundamental graph theoretic
relationships about vertices, edges, and faces. From there we will move towards
understanding how viruses self-assemble by exploring the principles of self-assembly,
fab labs, and four-dimensional printing.
11:30AM-12:15PM Lunch (on site)
12:15PM Load buses for trip to the Delaware Museum of Natural History
DISCovery Workshop University of Delaware/DDOE MSP Page 13
1:00PM – 3:00PM Interdisciplinary Workshop 6: STEAM Trails
Leaders: Halsey Spruance, Executive director of the Delaware Museum of Natural
History; Jill Karlson, Director of Public Programming, DMNH; Jon Manon, Mathematics
Education; and, Seth Hunt and John R. Jungck, Interdisciplinary Science Learning
Laboratories
Delaware Museum of Natural History Trip
Delaware Museum of Natural History: Founded in 1957 by John Eleuthere du
Pont, the Delaware Museum of Natural History is a private, non-profit corporation in
Wilmington, Delaware. Their mission is to investigate nature and science, preserve
and interpret their collections, conduct scientific research, and inspire people of all
ages to a lifetime of exploration and discovery. Through this mission, they strive to
achieve their purpose, which is to help develop a caring society that respects and
values our planet. The Museum is an indoor and outdoor experience where visitors
may appreciate an African watering hole, gaze up to a giant squid, encounter a
jaguar face-to-face, and marvel at the diversity of shells from around the globe.
Gallery highlights also include the only permanent dinosaur collection in Delaware,
a simulated coral reef, and a Science in Action paleontology lab. Throughout the year
the Museum also hosts several special exhibits on national tour. Over the past three
years, through a series of surveys, stakeholder interviews and group discussions,
many people helped inform the museum on how we can be more in tune with the
evolving needs of our community. An exciting new vision emerged: to break down
the barriers that limit typical natural history museums and place our guests at the
center of the metamorphosis. To this end, we are asking participants in the
DISCovery Workshop to help with this metamorphosis by developing Citizen
Science activities to be conducted on their grounds and produce art work to
promote interest in preserving their biodiverse ecosystem and distinctive Delaware
habitats: the woods and hills of New Castle County, the salt marshes of Kent County,
and the sandy beaches and the Great Cypress Swamp of Sussex County.
DISCovery Workshop University of Delaware/DDOE MSP Page 14
Halsey Spruance, who had been public relations director at the Brandywine
Conservancy for 10 years, began work as executive director of the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in December 2007. Under his guidance, the museum, whose displays
are anchored in prehistory, has already begun its leap into the future. Spruance’s
professional journey literally began with a single step: through the front door of the
National Geographic Society headquarters in Washington, D.C. He graduated from the
University of Delaware as an English major, completed the Publications Specialist
program at George Washington University, and earned a master’s degree in
communications from American University. He had a long career at the National
Geographic Society before returning to Delaware. His journey through NGS took him
from working in the records library to photo editorial assistant with Traveler magazine,
did public relations for the entire society, and finally, became a spokesman for the whole
National Geographic. His responsibilities included managing media and public awareness
for the book division, World children’s magazine, Traveler, and the society’s natural
history museum (Explorers Hall).
Jill Karlson is the Director of Public Programming
at the Delaware Museum of Natural History. She
has been the creator and developer of the DMNH
STEAM Trail and is chiefly responsible for
educational programming at the Museum. She
oversees the Museum's Education Division as well
as the Exhibits and Communications Departments.
Previously, she was the curator of education at the
Brandywine Zoo for 17 years. She has a BS from
Palm Beach Atlantic University and an MA from
the College of William and Mary in Virgina.
DISCovery Workshop University of Delaware/DDOE MSP Page 15
In addition to having an opportunity to see some of the incredible collections of the
Delaware Museum of Natural History and its current plans for a major remodeling, we
will learn about a series of activities that they have developed for pre-school children,
elementary school students, and middle-school students to explore along their “STEAM
Trail.” Some things like identifying scat from multiple species are appropriate for any
age, but we would like you to help us develop other activities that might be more
appropriate for your high-school students, and to think about what you would emphasize
if you built a STEAM trail on your own school grounds.
3:00PM – 3:30PM Discussion of group decisions for workshops their school wants to
choose to explore on Thursday.
3:30PM Board buses for return to the ISE Lab
The
Delaware
Museum of
Natural
History
provides the
map at left
and further
details
which can
be found in
the
following
link
http://www
.delmnh.org
/outdoors-
2/.
DISCovery Workshop University of Delaware/DDOE MSP Page 16
Thursday 24 January 2018
8:30AM – 11:30AM Teachers will reconvene with their school teams in one or another of
the five major interdisciplinary strands introduced the day before: 1) Interdisciplinary
Workshop 1: Astrophotography and Galaxy Zoo; 2) Interdisciplinary Workshop 2:
Dance: Physics and Ecology; 3) Interdisciplinary Workshop 3: Improv Science;
4) Interdisciplinary Workshop 4: Art Conservation: Chemistry in Service of History;
5) Interdisciplinary Workshop 5: 4D Fab Lab From Dürer and Dali to 4D Printing: You
Can’t Make It Til’ You Shake It
11:30AM-12:15PM Lunch (on site)
12:30PM -1:30PM Michael C. Moore, Department of Biological Sciences
Does Your Biological Clock Run on Time? Professor Moore will describe the
significance of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. He gave an incredible
well-illustrated talk this Fall which we wanted to share with you. The 2017 Nobel Prize
in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash, and
Michael W. Young for their elucidation of the molecular mechanisms controlling
circadian rhythm. Their pioneering work in Drosophila uncovered the internal
oscillators, or clocks, that synchronize cellular metabolism and organismal behavior to
the light/dark cycle to generate biological rhythms with 24 hour periodicity.
Professor Michael C. Moore
Department of Biological
Sciences
1:30PM - 2:00PM Presentation on the iSTEAM Practices by previous participants
2:00PM - 3:00PM Break into groups and work with staff on implementing projects
developed by teachers at other schools.
3:00PM - 3:30PM Survey and content knowledge evaluation, Allison Magagnosc from
Research & Evaluation Group, Public Health Management Corporation. Our external
evaluator will conduct a survey with the teachers and administer a pedagogical content
knowledge post-test using the Pedagogy of Science Teaching Test (POSTT).
3:30PM - 4PM Planning for the June 2018 Summer Student Academy
Professor Michael C. Moore is an
integrative systems biologist working at
the interface between behavior,
neuroscience, physiology and ecology. He
is interested in the reproductive biology of
vertebrates, especially the neuroendocrine
regulation of reproduction and reproductive
behavior. He studies natural
populations of free-living animals, because
many natural social behaviors are only
seen in wild animals. He is currently
interested in how the endocrine system
regulates tradeoffs between investments
in immune function and in reproduction in
two species of wild birds.


DISCovery Winter Workshop 2018
Harker ISE Lab
221 Academy Street, Newark DE 19716
Day 1 - Wednesday, January 24th
8:00 am Sign-in and Welcome by Jon Manon, Group Introductions, and Division into
initial four Working Groups Room 110
8:30 am Einstein’s Prediction of Gravitational Waves Confirmed and Visualized
Veronique Petit, Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Delaware
Room 110
9:30 - 11:30 am : Four Interdisciplinary Workshops See room numbers below
Workshop #1
Astrophotography and
Galaxy Zoo
Workshop #2
Dance: Physics
and Ecology
Workshop #4 Art
Conservation:
Chemistry in
Service of
History
Workshop #5
4D Fab Lab From
Durer and Dali to
4D Printing: you
Can’t Make It Til’
You Shake It
Lab Room
212
PBL Room
215
PBL Room 110 Lab Room 112 Lab Room 107
11:30 am - 12:15 pm - Lunch (on site): First Floor Break Out Area
12:15 pm - Load bus for trip to the Delaware Museum of Natural History
1:00 - 3:00 pm - Interdisciplinary Workshop 6: STEAM TRAILS
3:00 - 3:30 pm - Discussion of group decisions for workshops their school wants
to explore on Thursday
3:30 pm - Board bus for return to the ISE Lab
DISCovery Winter Workshop 2018
Harker ISE Lab
221 Academy Street, Newark DE 19716
Day 2 - Thursday, January 25th
8:00 am - Sign-in and Welcome by Jon Manon, Group Introductions
8:30 - 9:30 am - Improv Science: Activities from the Chemical Heritage Society
9:30 - 11:30 am - Teachers will reconvene with their school teams in one of the
three major interdisciplinary strands (workshops) introduced the previous day
Workshop #1
Astrophotography and
Galaxy Zoo
Workshop #2
Dance: Physics and
Ecology
Workshop #5
4D Fab Lab From Durer
and Dali to 4D Printing:
You Can’t Make It Til’
You Shake It
Lab Room
212
PBL Room
215
PBL Room 110 Lab Room 107
11:30 am - 12:15 pm - Lunch (on site)
12:30 - 1:30 pm - Does Your Biological Clock Run on Time?
Michael C. Moore, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Delaware
Room 110
1:30 - 2:00 pm - Presentation on the iSTEAM practices by previous participants
Room 110
2:00 - 3:00 pm - Break into groups and work with staff on implementing projects
developed by teachers at other schools Room 110
3:00 - 3:30 pm - Survey and content knowledge evaluation, Allison Magagnosc
from Research & evaluation Group, Public Health Management Corporation
Room 110
3:30 - 4:00 pm - Planning for the June 2018 Summer Student Academy
Room 110